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How to be a Hackademic #39 by Charlotte Frost & Jesse Stommel
Image by http://www.flickr.com/photos/fiddleoak/ 
under this licence: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en_GBImage by http://www.flickr.com/photos/fiddleoak/ under this licence: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en_GB
How to be a hackademic pictureHybrid Pedagogy’s Jesse Stommel and our very own Charlotte Frost rethink academic life and writing productivity in this on-going series of hints, tips and hacks.

COLLABORATE. Get a writing buddy. This has a number of benefits. There are fewer tasks to complete and it’s less daunting than going it alone. You will spark each other’s imagination and probably work quicker as a result. And being accountable to someone other than yourself can add a bit of useful pressure. Collaboration can be as elaborate as you want it to be. Some writers can collaborate fully, finishing each other’s sentences, to the point where even they can’t recognize where one person’s writing ends and the next person’s begins (which is how these tips were written). Other collaborators work best when they cut a project into sections and divvy them up. Each working relationship is slightly different, so don’t set up too many expectations in advance about how you’ll work together.

 

Want more hackademic tips ? Click here!


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