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#AcWri Twitter Chat – Writing Grant Applications
twitterwritte

The latest #acwri live chat was all about writing grant applications for research funding. Jeremy has done the storify summary of this chat and you can view it at his webpage as well.

Weekly Wisdom #65 by Paul Gray and David E. Drew
WTDTYIGS Cover image

PREPARE AN “ELEVATOR SPEECH”. Throughout your PhD studies, your professors grounded you in your discipline and taught you all the caveats and disclaimers that must accompany your scholarly research.  Then, in the dissertation defense, and afterwards, for example when you seek a job, you will be asked to succinctly summarize your work and what it means. Imagine that you are attending a national conference.  You step into an express elevator on the 45th floor of the building, and push “lobby”.  the only other person in the elevator is, say the senior Federal policy maker in your area of interest, for example, the National Endowment for the Humanities or the President’s Science Advisor, or the chair of the department you really want to interview for a job.  He or she says that they heard that you completed an important dissertation study.  S/he explains that s/he would like to know about your research, but,given a packed schedule, only has this elevator ride to learn about your work.  What do you tell them?


Weekly Wisdom #35
Thinker

Weekly Wisdom #35

Bear the global financial crisis in mind; this is a really difficult time to make a solid case for a speculative project!