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How to be a Hackademic #4 by Charlotte Frost & Jesse Stommel
Image by http://www.flickr.com/photos/fiddleoak/ under this licence: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en_GB

Hybrid Pedagogy’s Jesse Stommel and our very own Charlotte Frost rethink academic life and writing productivity in this on-going series of hints, tips and hacks.

CHOOSE YOUR BATTLES WISELY. We’re principled beings us academics and biting your tongue every time you feel something is wrong or unjust is going to get painful. We don’t want you to shy away from a fight that is important to you. Actually, we’re hugely in favor of fighting for what you believe in. We just want you to recognise which battles are the most important. If you argue over everything, you’re going to get a reputation for being difficult. If you pick a fight carefully, your colleagues will be more likely to listen (and respond well) because it’ll be clear to them that this really is an important issue for you. Besides, a lot is built on bright “hellos” and coffee runs. Very little is gained by making enemies. If you fall out with someone, even if you don’t agree with them or are having an all-out personality clash, try your hardest to create a convivial working relationship. If you make an enemy, not only can it jeopardize your career growth (they might sit on a panel deciding your fate some day) but you’ll make your work day a lot less pleasant.

Want more tips on Hackademic? Click here!


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