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How to be a Hackademic #27 by Charlotte Frost & Jesse Stommel
Image by http://www.flickr.com/photos/fiddleoak/ under this licence: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en_GB

How to be a hackademic pictureHybrid Pedagogy’s Jesse Stommel and our very own Charlotte Frost rethink academic life and writing productivity in this on-going series of hints, tips and hacks.

PURGE YOUR THOUGHTS. Instead of asking yourself to practice writing, you might instead think of your daily writing as a sort of mental purging. You could, for example, start or end your day with a diary-style cleansing of your thoughts. Why would so many people write diaries if it wasn’t so incredibly useful in making sense of your own head? And besides, therapists can be really expensive! Sometimes we can’t see the forest for the trees, so siting down and writing whatever comes to mind can be a good way of getting some of distracting ideas out of your way. Likewise, engaging in a free-form writing session can spark some untapped creativity, helping us see some wilder connections in our ideas that we hadn’t considered before.

This tip also can help you with your thoughts.


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